Texas woman spots alligator with knife in its head at community lake

An alligator with a knife in its head was found in a Sugar Land neighborhood lake.

An alligator with a knife in its head was found in a Sugar Land neighborhood lake.

Photo: Courtesy

Sugar Land resident Erin Weaver, who lives at Orchard Lakes Estates, is used to seeing alligators at her neighborhood lake.

On Thursday, however, something unusual caught her eye: A gator with a large protruding item in its head.

Recommended Video

Speed

Normal

Quality

Auto

Quality

Speed

0.25

0.50

0.75

Normal

1.25

1.50

1.75

00:00

00:00

"I stopped and was watching it when it turned and swam towards me," Weaver told Chron.com.

On CHRON.COM: 11-foot alligator breaks into Florida home

"It came up to the edge of the water and sat there. It had what looked like a steak knife sticking out of its head, near its right eye."

Weaver said the gator, which she estimates was 6- to 7- feet-long, showed no aggression and she felt comfortable moving closer to the animal to asses the situation and take photos.

"Someone had to get up close to the gator in order to stab a knife through its thick skin," she said. "I don’t understand why someone would be so cruel."

Gator won’t go without a fight: 8-foot reptile caught near Cleveland throws-off wrangler

Weaver posted her photos to her community’s Facebook page for assistance. Hopefully, help is on the way.

A Texas Parks and Wildlife game warden is expected to evaluate the alligator on Friday, she said.

Marcy de Luna is a digital reporter. You can follow her on Twitter @MarcydeLuna and Facebook @MarcydeLuna. Read her stories on our breaking news site, Chron.com, and on our subscriber site, HoustonChronicle.com. | Marcy.deLuna@chron.com | Text CHRON to 77453 to receive breaking news alerts by text message

Source Article

Tornadoes touch down in Texas and beyond

Tornadoes touch down in Texas and beyond

A spate of tornadoes raked across the Southern Plains on Saturday, leaving damage and causing injuries, with parts of the region bracing for more severe thunderstorms and possible flooding.

The National Weather Service confirmed an EF-2 twister Saturday morning with winds up to 130 mph that destroyed at least two homes and left one person with minor injuries in southwestern Oklahoma.

A suspected tornado caused roof damage to "numerous" homes in northwestern Arkansas, a state official said, and severe winds downed trees and power lines across a highway, blocking all lanes.

Tornadoes touched down Friday in Kansas and rural Nebraska, tearing up trees and power lines, and damaging homes and farm buildings, according to the National Weather Service.

In Abilene, Texas, 150 miles west of Fort Worth, strong winds prompted the evacuation of a nursing home and left many homes and businesses damaged, according to the Abilene Reporter-News. A spokeswoman for the city said no deaths or serious injuries were reported.

The National Weather Service issued a tornado watch for the western half of Arkansas. Portions of North Texas also were under a tornado watch, and a flash-flood warning was issued in the Dallas area.

Forecasters warned of heavy rain, lightning, ping-pong-ball-sized hail and flooding as a line of storms moved west to east, covering an area from south of Killeen, Texas, to north of the Oklahoma state line.

In Oklahoma City, thunderstorms prevented workers from securing and removing glass from Devon Tower, which was damaged Wednesday when a scaffolding holding two window washers banged against the building, the Oklahoman reported. Officials said the rain and wind blew broken glass from the tower and compromised the integrity of other panes.

Fire officials in Comanche County, Okla., said that two people escaped from a home destroyed by a tornado without injury, and another person was taken to a hospital as a precaution.

Meanwhile, in Montana, snowmelt and rain have caused the Clark Fork River to rise, with officials issuing a flood warning.

Ray Nickless of the weather service said recent warm weather was melting mountain snowpack and rain was expected to add to the rising flows.

The flood warning includes the same Missoula neighborhood that flooded at this time last year and forced the evacuation of dozens of homes.

A promotional image.

Source Article

Roach lifts Texas past TCU 58-44 and into NIT championship

NEW YORK (AP) — Kerwin Roach II is the Texas guard’s name, the numerals not part of the running tally marker for his season suspensions.

Back on the roster, Roach stayed in the game and kept the Longhorns in the hunt to end the season in New York with a championship.

Roach turned a season marred by suspension into a can’t-miss performance in the first half to help Texas get comfortable at Madison Square Garden and beat TCU 58-44 on Tuesday night for a spot in the NIT championship.

"It was tough for our team when he went out," coach Shaka Smart said. "It was certainly tough for him. He was really, really down and disappointed in himself."

"But, I told him, you’re going to get to play again."

He’s got one more game left, and the Longhorns (20-16) will play Lipscomb for the title on Thursday night at the Garden.

Roach served two suspensions this season and was pained as he had to watch senior night festivities from the bench. Roach was reinstated for the Big 12 Tournament and led Texas to its fourth straight win in the NIT. He scored 13 of his 22 points in the first half to spark the Longhorns to a 15-point lead, and they held on against pesky TCU (23-14). Texas can win its first NIT title since 1978.

TCU had swept the season series against Texas and failed to go 3-0 against its in-state and Big 12 rival. Texas still has won 18 of the last 25 games against the Horned Frogs.

TCU coach Jamie Dixon insisted his team (with a 7-11 mark in the Big 12) was snubbed by the NCAA Tournament selection committee and used it as a motivating force for the program. Fueled by the snub, the Horned Frogs stormed past Sam Houston State, Nebraska and Creighton to get to New York.

Dixon has led a traditionally downtrodden program in TCU into a mid-pack Big 12 winner, one reason why speculation has swirled that UCLA has targeted him as a candidate for its vacancy.

"I have a great job. I’m very lucky where I’m at," Dixon said, dismissing UCLA questions.

Alex Robinson, who led TCU with 12 points, said Dixon made postseason play possible in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I remember before he got here, we were a really separated bunch," he said. "He made sure we came together and played together."

The Horned Frogs won the NIT in 2017 and made the NCAA Tournament last season for the first time in 20 years. The push for back-to-back tourney bids fell just short, and so did a second-half run that whittled the lead to five.

Roach dunked off a beautiful backdoor cut and Dylan Osetkowski scored a baseline layup off a pick-and-roll to give Texas breathing room and end the threat. Roach had averaged 15.7 points in the NIT, Osetkowski had 15.3 points and the duo delivered again in the semifinal. Osetkowski, who had 13 points and nine rebounds, connected on a late 3 that made it a 14-point lead and left only a few hundred burnt orange cheering faithful in the house.

Smart has only said that Roach violated university policy for the stretch-run suspension of his leading scorer (14.8 points). Roach had also been suspended for the season opener and the 2016 season opener. Against TCU, Roach hit his only 3 and made 6 of 8 shots overall in the first half for 13 points and a 31-17 lead.

The Longhorns went 1-4 in his absence over his most recent suspension ended before the Big 12 Tournament.

Three career suspensions, and one more chance to cut down the nets.

"He’s a guy that’s got a level of athleticism that allows him to get by his man and put the other team in a bit of a bind," Smart said.

GET COMFY AGAIN

Texas returns to MSG in November — along with Duke, Georgetown and California — to play in the Empire Classic.

UP NEXT

It’s a Thursday night matchup against Lipscomb in the NIT championship. Garrison Mathews swished his ninth 3-pointer of the game in front of an exuberant Lipscomb bench for the lead with 1:10 left in the game to send the Bisons past Wichita State 71-64 . Mathews finished with 34 points.

___

More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/MarchMadness and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source Article

Finding A Good Apartment In Richardson

A good apartment in Richardson shouldn’t be too difficult for you to find. You just have to know how to look for a place that is well taken care of and that doesn’t cost too much. There are plenty of options out there so take your time and finding what works should happen for you.

You’re going to want to find out what the price is going to be to rent a place before you decide to live there. Then you have to think about the money you can make in a month and whether you can afford the rent or not. You don’t want to end up living in a place that has a higher price than what you can afford because you can end up getting evicted. If you can’t afford your rent, then it’s a waste of your time so always look into what you really can afford to pay.

You don’t just have to pay the rent when you live in some apartments. If they don’t include the utilities, then you’re going to have to pay for them yourself. Before you move into a place, it can help to call the office there and ask them what it costs on average to live in their apartments. You don’t want to find out after you rent a place that you can afford the rent but you can’t afford the utilities. Having a problem paying utilities can lead to a problem like you having to deal with the electricity company turning off your electricity for non payment.

When you’re going to live somewhere, you’re going to have to pay more than just the first month in rent to move in. You generally also have to pay a security deposit if you want to live somewhere and you may have to also pay the last month’s rent. This is why you’re going to want to ask what all you’re going to have to pay from a background check to the last month in rent. When you know all of what you have to pay, you can then decide if you can move in.

Get to know what’s going on in the apartments that you’re thinking of living in. The best way to do this is to find reviews on what is out there before you live anywhere to get an idea of what a place is like. If all you find are people complaining about the apartments, then you know not to rent there even if the place is set at a price that is good. You’re best off finding a place that has a solid reputation even if it costs a little more so you don’t always have a lot to worry about.

When you want to find an apartment in Richardson, just use this guide. There are a lot of great apartments out there that you can live in. But, there are also some that are not so nice so you have to do some research on what’s out there.

State, not schools, denied kids special ed services, Texas administrators say

TNS

Kids were denied special ed services because of state’s "dereliction of duty," not schools,’ Texas administrators say.

Texas educators are pushing back against Gov. Greg Abbott’s assertion that children were denied special education services because of schools’ "dereliction of duty."

Last week, federal authorities found that schools across the state broke the law by intentionally delaying or denying students such programs in order to stay under perceived enrollment caps and avoid state scrutiny.

Abbott then ordered the state’s education commissioner to have a draft correction plan finished by this week, adding that the "dereliction of duty on the part of many school districts to serve our students, and the failure of TEA to hold districts accountable, are worthy of criticism."

But the Texas School Alliance, Texas Council of Administrators for Special Education and the Texas Association of School Administrators say they were only doing what state officials and the Texas Education Agency pressured them to do: reign in enrollment because of rising costs.
State policy continuously put educators in the precarious spot of doing what was right for kids or taking a hit on accountability measurements that can lead to strict scrutiny, said Alief Superintendent H.D. Chambers.

"Fingers keep being pointed as to who’s to blame for this, and the governor says school districts were being derelict in their duty," said Chambers, president elect of the Texas School Alliance that represents the state’s largest districts. "We were not derelict in our duties. We were doing what we were told to do. For the agency to claim that they never were trying to enforce some kind of hard cap is just not true."

Chambers said that during his time as a Houston-area school administrator, he’s been in various conversations in which districts were trying to do what was right for students, only to have state officials pressure them to keep special education enrollment down. Schools often tried to find ways to help kids even when it meant the schools were in conflict with the state, he said.

The Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education issued a statement saying Abbott’s comment was "offensive and inaccurate." The group points to significant budget cuts for schools amid overall soaring student enrollment increases and stepped-up accountability standards.
"It is not a dereliction of duty to follow a directive from your state regulatory agency, while at the same time trying to meet the needs of all students," according to the group’s statement.

Representatives from Abbott’s office did not return messages seeking comment.

The various educator groups point to a 2004 interim House report as being the likely genesis of the special education cap.

TEA officials have long insisted that an accountability measurement that required monitoring of special education enrollment was never intended to limit the number of children who could receive services, but rather was put in place to help districts be aware of potential issues. Districts across the state had previously been in trouble for unnecessarily placing kids — particularly minority students — in special education classes.

TEA officials on Tuesday declined to comment on the Texas School Alliance’s statements saying, "The Texas Education has been consistent with its position regarding this indicator. Our agency’s focus now is meeting the governor’s directive to draft a corrective action plan to address the issues identified in the monitoring report."

The U.S. Department of Education began investigating the state’s special education program after the Houston Chronicle reported that thousands of students had been denied services because of a perceived 8.5 percent cap on special education enrollment.

In 2004, 11.6 percent of Texas students were in special education. That dropped to 8.6 percent by 2016.

Many have speculated as to how the so-called cap began, while TEA has insisted there wasn’t one.
The alliance and others point to a 2004 interim House report that looked at various special education issues including cost containment. It noted the state was reviewing how the state’s school finance system encouraged "overidentification" of students because districts receive more state funds to educate such children.

The report pointed to other states that used caps on either the number of students who could be identified as eligible for services or on the amount of state money available. The alliance’s statement says that TEA eventually adopted its policy because of this discussion.

But Kent Grusendorf, a former Republican lawmaker from Arlington who was chairman of the House’s Public Education committee at that time, said at no point did he or other lawmakers create legislation that made TEA create any form of a quota.

"We never passed a bill that I know of that did that," he said. "The House committee couldn’t direct TEA to do anything. All we could do was pass legislation."

Grusendorf said that now, some 14 years later, the only specific discussions about special education enrollment that he remembers was when a 29-member select committee was trying to find solutions to ongoing school finance litigation.

One witness had talked in depth about students being misidentified as needing special education, he said. The 2004 interim report also noted that for decades, there had been concerns about minority students being identified for such programs in disproportionate numbers.

"It was a double-sided coin because we had to take care of kids that needed it, but if you misidentified a kid, that meant holding a kid back," he said. "And there was a financial incentive to misidentify kids because that meant more money for districts."

Chambers, however, noted that the extra funding schools get for such students doesn’t come close to covering the cost for services to help them.

Under federal law, schools must provide qualifying students with special education accommodations or services without a limit on the number of students who can receive such support.

The state has already scrapped the accountability measurement based solely on special education enrollment.

And various districts have reviewed their own programs to see what the stumbling blocks are for families to get services. In Dallas, for example, officials found language to be a key barrier and are working to help Spanish-speaking families have better access.

Disability rights advocates say that Texas’ plan moving forward must include a system for identifying kids who should have received help but were denied.

Source Article

Rare snowfall, frigid temperatures in South and East Texas

A small snowman stands in front of the Alamo as snow falls in downtown San Antonio, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017.

SAN ANTONIO — Frigid temperatures behind a cold front combined with moisture off the Gulf of Mexico have yielded a rare snowfall in many parts of South and Southeast Texas.

The National Weather Service reports snow from San Antonio into East Texas. National Weather Service meteorologist Brett Williams said up to 2.5 inches of snow had been measured as of 9 p.m. Thursday in the San Antonio area. The most recent comparable snowfall in San Antonio had been in January 1987, when 1.3 inches of snow accumulated, but the most recent major snowfall was 13.2 inches in January 1985.

CPS Energy reported about 63,000 customers had lost power due to the storm as of 9 p.m., CBS San Antonio affiliate KENS reports. Temperatures are expected to reach as low as 25 degrees in some areas, killing crops and other sensitive vegetation.

CBS Houston affiliate KHOU’s chief meteorologist David Paul said there could see a wintry mix sometime in the Houston-area after 8 p.m. Thursday and possible snowflakes overnight into Friday morning. Paul said if there is any accumulation of snow, they will be in grassy areas, as the ground will be too warm for it to stick. Therefore, we shouldn’t expect any problems with travels on the road, he says.

Up to 3 inches of snow was expected in the Corpus Christi area by Friday morning. Weather Service meteorologist Kevin Wagner said the most recent comparable snowfall in Corpus Christi was 4.4 inches on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, 2004.

Snow flurries were also reported in Austin, CBS Austin reports.

Source Article

Apartments for Rent in Richardson, TX

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Explore the City
Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

Nearby

Source Article

Family that lost 10 members in Texas church massacre remembered

Mourners walk past caskets containing the bodies of members of the Holcombe and Hill families, victims of the Sutherland Springs First Baptist Church shooting, during a graveside service in Sutherland Springs, Tex. on Wednesday. (Darren Abate/Reuters)

FLORESVILLE, Tex. — Thousands of mourners said goodbye and celebrated the lives of an extended family that lost 10 of its members nearly two weeks ago in a mass shooting inside their small-town Texas church.

Colorful caskets contained the bodies of three generations of the Holcombe family, from an unborn child and a 1-year-old to the church’s 60-year-old associate pastor. Mourners overfilled an event center here, full of sorrow and of hope, knowing that the members of a deeply faithful family — who had been praising God when killed — were now home in heaven.

The event was open to the public but closed to the news media as members of the community continued to heal from one of the nation’s worst mass shootings 10 days earlier. Those who attended the ceremony said the family patriarch — Joe Holcombe — also prayed for the family of Devin Patrick Kelley, the 26-year-old who took his life after killing more than two dozen congregants at First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs on Nov. 5. Kelley was cremated on Friday.

Law enforcement officials have said Kelley was involved in a domestic dispute with his in-laws before the shootings; his mother-in-law has attended the church, and his wife’s grandmother was among those he killed there. Kelley had attended a fall festival at the church on Halloween just days before he returned with a semiautomatic assault-style rifle and fired hundreds of rounds inside. He was shot by a neighbor who heard the gunfire. Kelley fled in his car while being chased, and ran off the road and shot himself.

The small town has since begun burying many of its residents, while 20 people who were shot continue to recover and process what happened.

The service Wednesday afternoon was packed with hundreds of relatives, neighbors, friends and strangers paying their respects to Joe Holcombe’s son Bryan and his wife, Karla Holcombe; Bryan and Karla’s son Danny Holcombe and his 1-year-old daughter Noah Grace; Bryan and Karla’s daughter-in-law Crystal Holcombe, her unborn child Carlin Holcombe and children Greg Hill, Emily Hill and Megan Hill; and Tara McNulty, a close family friend whose children were like grandchildren to Bryan and Karla.

As attendees waited to get inside, people left their spots in line to hug and shake hands with friends and neighbors; the attack killed or injured many in the First Baptist Church membership and affected almost everyone in this tiny town outside San Antonio. Many of those who were killed were in the church’s pews for Sunday services.

“They were always happy, and they loved the Lord with all their hearts,” Jane Johnson, a close family friend, said after the memorial.

Many in the community have turned to their faith to help cope with their losses, and the church decided not to hide the scene of the crime; instead leaders had it cleaned, painted and made into a standing memorial for those killed inside. White chairs embossed with the names of those who died — along with single red roses — stand solemnly in a stark-white sanctuary.

The day of the shootings, Bryan Holcombe, the associate pastor, was filling in for the church’s pastor, Frank Pomeroy, who happened to be out of town that day; Holcombe was on his way to the pulpit when he was killed. Both he and wife Karla, 58, taught their children to live their lives for the glory of God, friends and relatives said. Pomeroy buried his 14-year-old daughter Annabelle — who was killed in the attack — this week.

Bagpipers played “Amazing Grace” while pallbearers slowly rolled the caskets out to hearses that took the victims to a private burial. While many in attendance dabbed their eyes with tissues — individually bagged with a note from schoolchildren — some hummed along.

Source Article

Max Richardson

Send Flowers

Max Wayne Richardson passed away October 31, 2017. He was born June 14, 1944 in Lubbock, TX to the late Wayne and Naydine Richardson. Those left to cherish his memory are his loving wife Lisa Lee Sawyer, two children Sarah Whitney Bigham, Trevor Colin Richardson, three grandchildren, and brother Dennis Richardson. Max received his undergraduate and master’s degrees in History from Texas Tech University, and his PhD in Political Science/ Political Philosophy from the University of Georgia. He spent 18 months in the Peace Corps in Libya teaching English to children. He taught 20 years at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, SD and 25 years at Concordia College, Moorhead MN. Max was a mentor to hundreds of students and instilled in them a love of the law and the ideals of fairness and equality that are the foundations of our country. He was known for his wit, wisdom, and love of music. Max had a love for his dogs so to honor that love the family requests in lieu of flowers donations be made your local human society or ASPCA. A celebration of his life with be held at a later date.

Source Article

Top Things To Do In Richardson TX

Richardson, TX is an affluent suburb of Dallas. It is home to more than 5,000 businesses, mainly telecommunication companies, in addition to the University of Texas at Dallas. Richardson is a cultural center as well, especially since the Charles W. Eisemann Center opened. The following are some of the top places to visit in Richardson, Texas.

North Texas Automotive Museum

This museum is a real car lover’s dream. At over 100,000 square feet, the North Texas Automotive Museum houses a diverse collection of Hot Rod, sports, muscle, classic and antique cars, with around 80 of them being rotated for display at any one time. You can find Gull-wing, E-Type, SLR McLaren, Firebird, Alfa Romeo, Jaguar, BMW, Ford, Oldsmobile, Chevy, Mercedes, Rolls-Royce and other cars here at the museum.

Free Play Arcade

Both adults and kids will love this arcade! There are more than 80 retro arcade games featured at the Free Play Arcade in Richardson, including such classics as Space Invaders, Ms. Pacman, Dr. Mario and Donkey Kong. There are pinball machines and cocktail games as well.

The games are all set on “free play,” so you don’t need to bring any change with you. There are also plenty of arcade foods, snacks and great selection of beers available as well. The arcade is also available for group events and parties.

Breckenridge Park

This park is more than 400 acres and is largest park that the City of Richardson maintains. There is a large sports complex that includes 2 softball fields and 12 soccer fields. There is also 4.5 miles worth of hiking trails as well as covered pavilions and picnic tables. In addition, there is a gazebo, ponds and playground structures. Dog are allowed at the park if they are kept on a leash.