Texas woman dies from flesh-eating bacteria after raw oysters banquet

A Texas woman died in October from a flesh-eating bacteria after she consumed raw oysters.

Jeanette LeBlanc was crabbing with her friends and family on the Louisiana coast in September when she contracted the infection, KLFY reported.

LeBlanc and her friend Karen Bowers picked up some raw oysters in a Westwego market for a treat. The two women ate about two dozen raw oysters each before LeBlanc became ill, Bowers said.

Bowers said her friend looked like she developed an allergic reaction.

“An allergic reaction of sorts, that’s what I would call it. That’s what we thought,” Bowers told KLFY.

Two days later, LeBlanc’s condition worsened and doctors informed her that she had vibrio.

LeBlanc’s partner, Vicki Bergquist, explained vibrio to KLFY.

“It’s a flesh-eating bacteria. She had severe wounds on her legs from that bacteria,” Bergquist said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated eating raw oysters “can increase the chance you will get sick with vibriosis.” The CDC said people can also become infected with the bacteria after going swimming in warm seawater with an open wound.

LeBlanc fought the infection for 21 days but lost the battle on Oct. 15, 2017.

“I can’t even imagine going through that for 21 days. Most people don’t last,” said Bowers said.

“She was bigger than life,” Bergquist said. “She was a great person, laughed a lot, loved her family, loved her dad.”

Bowers and Bergquist told KLFY they were working on raising awareness of vibrio.

“If they really knew what could happen to them and they could literally die within 48, 36 hours of eating raw oysters, is it really worth it?” Bowers said.

“If we had known that the risk was so high, I think she would’ve stopped eating oysters,” Bergquist said.

Most infections happen between May and October and common symptoms include diarrhea, nausea, fever and chills. More severe infections can lead to death.

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Public memorial for Sherin Mathews to be dedicated Saturday in Dallas

Richardson Police Department

They only knew her from afar, from the news accounts they saw in the paper and on TV – and with her loss, those who mourn Sherin Mathews needed a place to grieve.

Saturday afternoon, a permanent site in memory of the 3-year-old Richardson girl will be dedicated following an interfaith ceremony at Restland Funeral Home and Cemetery, WFAA-TV (ABC8) reported.

Community members pushed for the memorial’s creation after the girl’s body was found in a culvert on Oct. 22, more than two weeks after her family reported her missing.

“She’s still in everybody’s hearts,” Richardson resident Shari Block told the station. “To have a place for the community just means so much.”

A donated granite bench engraved with Sherin’s name and an epitaph adorns the landscaped site, in a portion of the cemetery dedicated to young children. The epitaph reads: “A life that touches others goes on forever.”

“We really tried to find something that fit this situation,” said Restland family service specialist David Turnblad. “It just seemed right.”

The bench was donated by Richardson resident Gene Champagne, who’d won it in a raffle in Colleyville and almost immediately knew what he would do. “I won that for a reason,” he said.

Sherin’s story drew global attention, with thousands posting speculative theories about her death on Facebook and referring to her as “Princess Sherin” and “daughter of the world.” A makeshift memorial of balloons and stuffed animals grew at the site where her body was found.

One group even unsuccessfully petitioned authorities to release the girl’s body to the community for an interfaith burial.

Wesley Mathews, Sherin’s father, has been charged with injury to a child after telling police he “physically assisted” Sherin with drinking her milk before she choked and died. His wife, Sini, was arrested and charged with abandoning or endangering a child.

The Dallas County medical examiner has not released Sherin’s cause of death. She was buried in a private ceremony at an undisclosed location.

The couple adopted the girl from India. A second daughter, who is also 3, is living with relatives after initially being placed in foster care.

Saturday’s ceremony is set for 3 p.m. at Restland Memorial Chapel, 13005 Greenville Ave., with the site dedication and dove release to follow at 4 p.m.

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CPS Not Required To Reunite Mathews Family With Daughter

DALLAS, TX — A judge Tuesday ruled Child Protective Services won’t be required to help reunite Sini and Wesley Mathews with the couple’s 4-year-old biological daughter.

Sini and Wesley have not had their parental rights revoked, but Judge Cheryl Lee Shannon ruled they must not have contact with their daughter, according to the Dallas Morning News. Both parents face criminal charges related to their adopted 3-year-old daughter, Sherin Mathews, who was found dead in a culvert in Richardson in October.

The ruling came at the end of a two-day hearing that heard the testimony of both parents, a doctor, a CPS caseworker and a Richardson detective. The doctor, Suzanne Dakil, testified last week that she contacted Child Protective Services after seeing X-rays that suggested Sherin has been injured on more than one occasion.

CPS officials usually try to reunite children in foster care with their parents, but Shannon’s ruling means they don’t have to do so in this case. The Mathews’ biological daughter has lived with relatives in Houston since Nov. 20, where she will stay for the foreseeable future.

Both parents are being held in Dallas County Jail. Wesley is held on charges of Injury to a Child and a $1 million bail after he told police he removed her deceased body from the home after she choked on milk.

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Sini is held on a charge of Abandoning or Endangering a Child. A probable cause affidavit detailing events leading up to Sini’s arrest states that by leaving Sherin alone at the home on the night before she went missing, Sini and Wesley placed their adopted daughter “in imminent danger of death, bodily injury, or physical or mental impairment.” Sini’s bail was reduced to $100,000, and she could be released from jail if she posts bond.

A medical examiner has not yet details about Sherin’s cause of death.

Images via Richardson Police Department

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Rare snowfall, frigid temperatures in South and East Texas

A small snowman stands in front of the Alamo as snow falls in downtown San Antonio, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017.

SAN ANTONIO — Frigid temperatures behind a cold front combined with moisture off the Gulf of Mexico have yielded a rare snowfall in many parts of South and Southeast Texas.

The National Weather Service reports snow from San Antonio into East Texas. National Weather Service meteorologist Brett Williams said up to 2.5 inches of snow had been measured as of 9 p.m. Thursday in the San Antonio area. The most recent comparable snowfall in San Antonio had been in January 1987, when 1.3 inches of snow accumulated, but the most recent major snowfall was 13.2 inches in January 1985.

CPS Energy reported about 63,000 customers had lost power due to the storm as of 9 p.m., CBS San Antonio affiliate KENS reports. Temperatures are expected to reach as low as 25 degrees in some areas, killing crops and other sensitive vegetation.

CBS Houston affiliate KHOU’s chief meteorologist David Paul said there could see a wintry mix sometime in the Houston-area after 8 p.m. Thursday and possible snowflakes overnight into Friday morning. Paul said if there is any accumulation of snow, they will be in grassy areas, as the ground will be too warm for it to stick. Therefore, we shouldn’t expect any problems with travels on the road, he says.

Up to 3 inches of snow was expected in the Corpus Christi area by Friday morning. Weather Service meteorologist Kevin Wagner said the most recent comparable snowfall in Corpus Christi was 4.4 inches on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, 2004.

Snow flurries were also reported in Austin, CBS Austin reports.

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Apartments for Rent in Richardson, TX

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

A suburban city primarily nestled in Dallas County, Richardson is a diverse spread of commercial influence and houses a number of the world’s largest telecommunication companies. The city stands as a highly regarded area for establishing residence, with its low unemployment rate, low crime and overall high income rates. Residents enjoy Richardson’s award-winning park and recreation management that provide an abundance of outdoor opportunities for the community. Richardson lies approximately 14 miles from the center of Dallas.

Explore the City
Rent Trends

As of November 2017, the average apartment rent in Richardson, TX is $1,008 for a studio, $1,142 for one bedroom, $1,408 for two bedrooms, and $1,624 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Richardson has decreased by -0.4% in the past year.

Beds Avg Sq Ft Avg Rent Studio 575 $1,008 1 BR 786 $1,142 2 BR 1,107 $1,408 3 BR 1,399 $1,624
Ratings
Living in Richardson

Richardson presents a cross-cultural spread of independently owned bistros and eateries with a light distribution of nationally recognized food chains. Most restaurants are located in North Dallas within fairly close proximity to Highway 75.

A family-owned business originally established in 2012, Olive Burger serves residents of Richardson with a distinct menu of gourmet burgers, sandwiches and salads made fresh to order. The restaurant follows a strict standard and never uses anything other than fresh high-quality beef, buns and organic toppings. Customers love the affordable prices and cozy neighborhood atmosphere that Olive Burger offers, making it a top spot for locals wanting a quick lunch or full-on dinner. Try the Ultimate Burger, a divine combination consisting of a 1/2 pound of freshly grilled beef, three different cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles, complemented by sautéed mushrooms, onions, jalapeños, avocado and savory bacon.

Sushi Sake on North Collins Boulevard crafts some of the most delectable sushi in Richardson. Located in an ambient and elegantly decorated environment, Sushi Sake presents a menu of authentic and freshly cooked Japanese cuisines. The restaurant has a full sushi bar for customers to enjoy the freshest fish in the area. For the full experience, try the Sushi Sampler, a platter dish consisting of tuna, shrimp, salmon and a half California roll.

A sundry distribution of bars, lounges and nightclubs distinguish the nightlife experience in Richardson. The highest concentration of entertainment outlets can be found within the North Dallas area. Chase Place on East Belt Line Road presents a fusion dive bar and sports bar atmosphere. Guests enjoy access to a full bar, pool table and dance floor, with karaoke on select nights. For a lively yet laid back night out, residents of Richardson make their way to Mango’s Hookah Bar and Nightclub on East Main Street. The establishment offers precisely what its name implies with an upbeat and casual environment. Music pulses throughout the building, while guests let loose on the dance floor or relax with friends in the lounge areas, making for an overall energetic and lively experience.

Richardson received its first wave of inhabitants in 1840, when residents of Kentucky and Tennessee made their way to settle in the area. Richardson later saw the implementation of the Texas Electric Railway, in addition to the Red Brick Road, facilitating an increase in population, traffic and property values in the area. With Texas Instruments and the University of Dallas Texas moving to the area, Richardson continued to grow and spawn numerous parks and facilities. This gave way to a surge of residential development and commercial expansion that continued well into the 21st century.

Residents visit locations such as Heritage Farm Museum for an interactive and educational look into the late 19th and early 20th century Blackland Prairie history. With its variety of productions throughout the year, the Charles W. Eisemann Center serves as a prime location for experiencing the arts and theater scene of Richardson.

The most common means of transportation in Richardson are light rails and automobiles. The Dallas Area Rapid Transit dominates public transportation, with its heavy distribution of light rail lines throughout the city and numerous bus routes. Taxi services are available throughout Dallas, as well as Uber car service. Residents park in privately owned lots and metered parking spots throughout the city as well as within the relatively inexpensive public parking lots provided by a selection of DART stations in the area. Entrances to major highways, including Interstate 635, Highway 75 and State Highway 190, are located around Richardson.

The city presents a fairly walkable environment, with only a few areas considered to be car-dependent. Richardson promotes a cycling-friendly environment with over 15 miles of bicycle lanes and numerous bike routes throughout the city.

The cost of living in Richardson is 8 percent higher than the city average. Meanwhile, traveling to the center of the city costs about $2.50 for a two-hour DART pass. One-bedroom apartments rent at a median cost of approximately $900 per month. Typically, a pint of beer runs at about $6, while gas prices are around 11 percent lower than the national average.

An assortment of privately owned shops and specialty boutiques define the shopping experience in Richardson. A small spread of nationally recognized chain retailers and high-value stores can be found throughout the area as well. The majority of commercial outlets in Richardson are located in the North Dallas area.

Half of Half on West Campbell Road presents a rich selection of designer clothing at a fraction of the big-name cost. The store receives the majority of its inventory as the unsold merchandise of bigger chain retailers, so customers regularly find spectacular deals on a variety of name-brand clothing. Half of Half houses a neatly organized atmosphere, complemented by a helpful staff that is more than ready to help you find your newest outfit.

Silver Pyramid on South Colt Road perfectly embodies the neighborhood bookstore vibe, while offering a thorough selection of jewelry, gemstones, incense and specialty decor. Residents of Richardson consider this store a hidden gem due to its diverse inventory and affordable prices. The tranquil atmosphere, combined with the knowledgeable staff, makes Silver Pyramid a must-visit destination.

A number of independently owned grocery stores serve Richardson, with Sara’s Market & Bakery the popular choice for residential grocery needs. Located on South Sherman Street, the store functions as a Mediterranean and Indo-European specialty grocer but also sells a full selection of fresh produce, all-natural meats, imported cheeses and a variety of groceries. Sprouts Farmers Market on West Campbell Road embodies the old-fashioned farmers market feel and offers the freshest local fruits, vegetables, meats and goods.

A combination of scenic landscapes and exercise-centric traditional parks populate Richardson. Cottonwood Park combines the best of both worlds, offering access to a family-friendly environment full of amenities, including a basketball court, a volleyball court, playground equipment and an open, emerald-green landscape by a glistening freshwater lake that is the perfect backdrop for long walks with the family dog. Residents also enjoy frequenting both Crowley and Brekenridge parks, which offer similar features.

Be sure to catch the Cottonwood Art Festival in May, which showcases and celebrates local artwork in a festival environment filled with interactive events, food and drink galore, and live musical entertainment to top it all off.

Nearby

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Family that lost 10 members in Texas church massacre remembered

Mourners walk past caskets containing the bodies of members of the Holcombe and Hill families, victims of the Sutherland Springs First Baptist Church shooting, during a graveside service in Sutherland Springs, Tex. on Wednesday. (Darren Abate/Reuters)

FLORESVILLE, Tex. — Thousands of mourners said goodbye and celebrated the lives of an extended family that lost 10 of its members nearly two weeks ago in a mass shooting inside their small-town Texas church.

Colorful caskets contained the bodies of three generations of the Holcombe family, from an unborn child and a 1-year-old to the church’s 60-year-old associate pastor. Mourners overfilled an event center here, full of sorrow and of hope, knowing that the members of a deeply faithful family — who had been praising God when killed — were now home in heaven.

The event was open to the public but closed to the news media as members of the community continued to heal from one of the nation’s worst mass shootings 10 days earlier. Those who attended the ceremony said the family patriarch — Joe Holcombe — also prayed for the family of Devin Patrick Kelley, the 26-year-old who took his life after killing more than two dozen congregants at First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs on Nov. 5. Kelley was cremated on Friday.

Law enforcement officials have said Kelley was involved in a domestic dispute with his in-laws before the shootings; his mother-in-law has attended the church, and his wife’s grandmother was among those he killed there. Kelley had attended a fall festival at the church on Halloween just days before he returned with a semiautomatic assault-style rifle and fired hundreds of rounds inside. He was shot by a neighbor who heard the gunfire. Kelley fled in his car while being chased, and ran off the road and shot himself.

The small town has since begun burying many of its residents, while 20 people who were shot continue to recover and process what happened.

The service Wednesday afternoon was packed with hundreds of relatives, neighbors, friends and strangers paying their respects to Joe Holcombe’s son Bryan and his wife, Karla Holcombe; Bryan and Karla’s son Danny Holcombe and his 1-year-old daughter Noah Grace; Bryan and Karla’s daughter-in-law Crystal Holcombe, her unborn child Carlin Holcombe and children Greg Hill, Emily Hill and Megan Hill; and Tara McNulty, a close family friend whose children were like grandchildren to Bryan and Karla.

As attendees waited to get inside, people left their spots in line to hug and shake hands with friends and neighbors; the attack killed or injured many in the First Baptist Church membership and affected almost everyone in this tiny town outside San Antonio. Many of those who were killed were in the church’s pews for Sunday services.

“They were always happy, and they loved the Lord with all their hearts,” Jane Johnson, a close family friend, said after the memorial.

Many in the community have turned to their faith to help cope with their losses, and the church decided not to hide the scene of the crime; instead leaders had it cleaned, painted and made into a standing memorial for those killed inside. White chairs embossed with the names of those who died — along with single red roses — stand solemnly in a stark-white sanctuary.

The day of the shootings, Bryan Holcombe, the associate pastor, was filling in for the church’s pastor, Frank Pomeroy, who happened to be out of town that day; Holcombe was on his way to the pulpit when he was killed. Both he and wife Karla, 58, taught their children to live their lives for the glory of God, friends and relatives said. Pomeroy buried his 14-year-old daughter Annabelle — who was killed in the attack — this week.

Bagpipers played “Amazing Grace” while pallbearers slowly rolled the caskets out to hearses that took the victims to a private burial. While many in attendance dabbed their eyes with tissues — individually bagged with a note from schoolchildren — some hummed along.

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Max Richardson

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Max Wayne Richardson passed away October 31, 2017. He was born June 14, 1944 in Lubbock, TX to the late Wayne and Naydine Richardson. Those left to cherish his memory are his loving wife Lisa Lee Sawyer, two children Sarah Whitney Bigham, Trevor Colin Richardson, three grandchildren, and brother Dennis Richardson. Max received his undergraduate and master’s degrees in History from Texas Tech University, and his PhD in Political Science/ Political Philosophy from the University of Georgia. He spent 18 months in the Peace Corps in Libya teaching English to children. He taught 20 years at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, SD and 25 years at Concordia College, Moorhead MN. Max was a mentor to hundreds of students and instilled in them a love of the law and the ideals of fairness and equality that are the foundations of our country. He was known for his wit, wisdom, and love of music. Max had a love for his dogs so to honor that love the family requests in lieu of flowers donations be made your local human society or ASPCA. A celebration of his life with be held at a later date.

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Top Things To Do In Richardson TX

Richardson, TX is an affluent suburb of Dallas. It is home to more than 5,000 businesses, mainly telecommunication companies, in addition to the University of Texas at Dallas. Richardson is a cultural center as well, especially since the Charles W. Eisemann Center opened. The following are some of the top places to visit in Richardson, Texas.

North Texas Automotive Museum

This museum is a real car lover’s dream. At over 100,000 square feet, the North Texas Automotive Museum houses a diverse collection of Hot Rod, sports, muscle, classic and antique cars, with around 80 of them being rotated for display at any one time. You can find Gull-wing, E-Type, SLR McLaren, Firebird, Alfa Romeo, Jaguar, BMW, Ford, Oldsmobile, Chevy, Mercedes, Rolls-Royce and other cars here at the museum.

Free Play Arcade

Both adults and kids will love this arcade! There are more than 80 retro arcade games featured at the Free Play Arcade in Richardson, including such classics as Space Invaders, Ms. Pacman, Dr. Mario and Donkey Kong. There are pinball machines and cocktail games as well.

The games are all set on “free play,” so you don’t need to bring any change with you. There are also plenty of arcade foods, snacks and great selection of beers available as well. The arcade is also available for group events and parties.

Breckenridge Park

This park is more than 400 acres and is largest park that the City of Richardson maintains. There is a large sports complex that includes 2 softball fields and 12 soccer fields. There is also 4.5 miles worth of hiking trails as well as covered pavilions and picnic tables. In addition, there is a gazebo, ponds and playground structures. Dog are allowed at the park if they are kept on a leash.

Body of small child found during search for missing 3-year-old

RICHARDSON, Texas — Authorities on Sunday discovered the body of a small child while searching for a 3-year-old girl who has been missing for more than two weeks.

After she refused to drink her milk, the toddler’s father told her to stand by a tree approximately 100 feet away from the home, across an alleyway at 3 a.m. He later told police he knew coyotes had been seen in the alley where he told her to stay, the affidavit said.

Sherin Mathews of Richardson, Texas, was reported missing on Oct. 7, according to the Richardson Police Department.

She was last seen in the backyard of her family’s home early that morning by her adoptive father, Wesley Mathews.

The body was found around 11 a.m. Sunday in a culvert beneath a road, said Sgt. Kevin Perlich, spokesman for the police department.

An arrest has not been made in connection with the discovery of the body.

While a medical examiner has yet to see the child’s body and make a positive identification, Perlich said, “It is most likely” Sherin Mathews, and her parents have been notified of the discovery.

The cause of death has yet to be determined.

Police were waiting for an FBI evidence recovery team to process the scene on Sunday afternoon, Perlich said.

Multiple law enforcement agencies have participated in the ongoing search, including the FBI, U.S. Marshals and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, according to police.

Investigators combed Sherin’s neighborhood and surrounding area with K-9 teams and helicopters, and executed a search warrant at Mathews’ home on Oct. 10, police said.

Sherin’s father told police he left his daughter outside around 3 a.m. on Oct. 7, as punishment “because she wouldn’t drink her milk,” according to a probable cause document.

Leaving a child in imminent danger could mean up to 20 years for the toddler’s father, Wesley Mathews.

He told her to stand by a tree approximately 100 feet away from the home, across an alleyway.

He later told police he knew coyotes had been seen in the alley where he told her to stay, the affidavit said.

Around 3:15 a.m., when he went to retrieve the child, she was gone, the document says.

Police say Mathews didn’t contact police for five hours after he realized the child was missing.

Later that evening, Mathews was arrested and charged with abandoning or endangering a child, “as a result of his decision to place her outside a place of safety,” police said.

He is out on bond, according to police.

Police said on Oct. 12 that one of the Mathews’ vehicles had left the residence the morning Sherin went missing, between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m., between the time Mathews said Sherin disappeared and the time he called police.

An attorney for Sherin’s mother did not respond to requests for comment. It could not be determined whether Wesley Mathews was represented by an attorney.

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Texas county worker accused of stealing $1.2 million worth of fajitas

An employee of the Cameron County Juvenile Justice Department was arrested on allegations of stealing $1.2 million worth of fajitas over nine years. Photo by Miansari66/Wikimedia Commons

Oct. 16 (UPI) — Prosecutors in a Texas county said a Juvenile Justice Department employee is accused of stealing $1.2 million worth of fajitas over nine years.

The Cameron County District Attorney’s Office said Gilberto Escaramilla, who works for the county’s Juvenile Justice Department, took the day off for a medical appointment Aug. 7 and a driver from the department’s meat vendor, Labatt Food Service in Harlingen, called the kitchen to inform workers of an 800-pound fajita delivery.

A confused kitchen worker explained to the driver that the department doesn’t serve fajitas, leading the equally baffled driver to tell her he had been delivering fajitas to Juvenile Justice for nine years.

"If it wasn’t so serious, you’d think it was a Saturday Night Live skit. But this is the real thing," District Attorney Luis V. Saenz told the Brownsville Herald.

"The receiver of the call rushes off to the supervisor and conveys to her the discussion that had been had, and that breaks the case," Saenz said. "When Mr. Escaramilla reports to work the next day, he is confronted with the discussion and he admits he had been stealing fajitas for nine years."

Saenz said Escaramilla was fired Aug. 8 and arrested Aug. 9 when the district attorney’s Office Special Investigations Unit executed a search warrant on his home and found packets of fajitas in his refrigerator.

Investigators said Escaramilla had stolen a total $1,251,578 worth of fajitas.

"He would literally, on the day he ordered them, deliver them to customers he had already lined up," Saenz said. "We’ve been able to uncover two of his purchasers, and they are cooperating with the investigation."

Escaramilla was released on bond and was arrested again Tuesday on a charge of first-degree felony theft.

Saenz said the Juvenile Justice Department has been consistently exceeding its line item budget for years, but officials failed to uncover the fajita scheme.

"Up and down the chain of authority, people were signing off on these things," Saenz said. "It’s upsetting because the auditor gets a detailed invoice where it states the breakdown of what’s delivered, so they should’ve seen it."

Chief Juvenile Probation Officer Rose Gomez of the Cameron County Juvenile Justice Department said the department is cooperating fully with the investigation and is reviewing its procedures to prevent future incidents.

A former county employee in Arkansas pleaded guilty to fraud in September after using a government credit card for personal purchases, including a tuxedo for her dog.

Kristi Lyn Goss, 44, who was arrested in October 2016 on allegations of using a Garland County government credit card to make nearly $200,000 worth of personal purchases while working as an administrative assistant to Judge Rick Davis, pleaded guilty in Garland County Court to six fraudulent uses of the card.

Investigators said Goss’ purchases included personal bill payments, nearly $1,000 worth of Arkansas Razorbacks tickets, a diamond bracelet, clothing, school lunches for her children, pet insurance and a tuxedo for her pug.

Goss is scheduled to be sentenced in November.

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